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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
said that the surge would be "the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam"? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to the surge -- >> are you answering the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> well -- >> i would like the answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things. >> well, let the record show you refused to answer that question. now please go ahead. >> well, if you would like me to explain why -- >> i actually would like an answer. yes or no? >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that. >> senator mccain and a lot of republican washington is banking on the lesson learned from the iraq war, being that we should have started that war, we should have escalated that war, we should have kept that war going, and now ten years on our only regret about the iraq war should be that we're not still there. and the only thing w
. it usually happens at the start of a second term. today, the focus is on the foreign policy team. tahman bradley is watching the ever-changing lineup and joins us from washington with more. hi, tahman. >> reporter: hey, rob and sunny. a lot of action with president obama's cabinet. kerry is in at state, clinton is out. and chuck hagel, a republican, who you would think would be hailed as a bipartisan pick, is under fire. senator john kerry takes the oath of office today as secretary of state, replacing hillary clinton who heads off to retirement with a big question still lingering, will she run for president? >> i don't know how else to say it but i'm going get back into my life again. this is going to be new for me. i don't know how i'm going to react to it, to be honest. >> reporter: senator kerry takes over after cruising through confirmation in the senate. president obama's choice to run the pentagon is a different story. former senator chuck hagel, a vietnam veteran, took heavy fire from members of his own party for his opposition to the 2007 troop surge in iraq. >> were you correct
respected now than it was four years ago. i think she was very good at foreign policy. i think this will help her in 2016. host: we go next to jeff, from mississippi, the republican line. caller: good morning, how are you? i would rate her at about a 2. she got sworn in, she looked good, she flew around the world, and that was about it. there is nothing she has accomplished, and i do not think our allies are pleased with her. our enemies in the past believe in the -- the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. the only thing that bad people in this world understand is force. i do not think talking to them and making it nice with them is actually going to do anything. host: you made a statement about our allies and their perception. can you expand on that? behind wthe lead from strategy got two diplomats killed and three brave americans killed in libya. what responsibility has she taken for that? none. she said to the american people, what difference does it make how that information was disbursed to the people? >> you can see that hearing on a c-span.org and watche
on foreign policy can do it through hagel today, through this hearing. the past positions hagel has taken where supporters of israel believe that he has made statements that suggest he's soft on israel, he does not support the president's positions on iran, or that he does not view hezbollah as a terrorist organization, administration officials say he will clearly address all those past statements, put them to bed and make it emphatic that he fully supports the president's positions today and yet they know this will be a drawn out in their view political exercise and think he could get confirmed by well more than the 60% majority because he's a member of the senate club and in the end they support somebody who they view as a senator and in the white house's view still a mainstream person. jake? >> we're listening right now as we're watching right now as senator levin of michigan introduces the new members of the senate armed services committee, senator levin, democrat of michigan we see there, next is senator chuck hagel, was former republican senator from virginia john warner, chuck hage
of a foreign-policy think tank. at his confirmation hearing today, he had some back and forth with former colleagues, including senator john mccain. that exchange is about an hour and a half into the hearing. later, we will get your thoughts about the nomination and hearing on our phone lines at 11:00 p.m. eastern, 8:00 pacific. carl levin chairs the armed services committee and makes the opening statement. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> good morning, everybody. the committee meets today to consider the nomination of former senator chuck hagel to be secretary of defense. before i begin, i want to first welcome senator inhofe as the new ranking republican on our committee, succeeding senator mccain. senator mccain has been a great partner over the past six years, and i thank him for all the work he has done to get bills enacted, his leadership on a host of issues, his support for the work of this committee, and for always keeping our hearings likely. -- lively. senator inhofe has shown his strong commitmen
. >> reporter: hagel talked about the surge with scorn. >> the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam if it's carried out. >> reporter: a source close to mccain said the friends just drifted apart, as friends sometimes do. not because of policy differences. but even mccain acknowledges the change. >> i've noticed over the years that our views on the united states of america and what we should be doing in the world has diverged rather dramatically. >> reporter: by mccain's 2008 presidential run, hagel was more in line with barack obama. the two traveled together on a mideast trip obama used to beef up his foreign policy chops. and hagel was never seen on mccain's straight talk express. and mccain has been very careful to say he will not block hagel's nomination to be the president's defense secretary, but he also says he's not sure if he will vote for him because of their deep differences now over big issues like iran and afghanistan. mccain's questioning of hagel at this morning's hearing will be the most highly anticipated because of their differences on
is very good in foreign policy and i think she will be -- i think this will help her in 2016. host: we go next to jeff in tupelo, mississippi. republican line. caller: good morning. how are you? host: fine, thank you. caller: she got sworn in, she looked good in the pictures, she flew around the world a little bit, and nothing that she has accomplished. i don't think our allies are real pleased with. our enemies in the past belief in the best predictor of -- i mean, future behavior is past behavior. the only thing that the real bad people in this world understand is force. i don't think talking to them and making nice-nice with them is going to do anything except emboldened them. host: you made a statement about our allies and their perception? could you expand on that? caller: well, the lead from behind strategy of this administration got two diplomats killed and three brave americans killed in libya. as far as her taking responsibility for that, what responsibility is it that she has actually taken? none she actually said to the american people what difference does it make now for that
you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country's -- were you correct or incorrect? >> well i am not going to give you a -- a yes or no answer. >> show that he refused to answer the question. >> reporter: hagel did answer, standing by his word on the iraq war and revealing something about the kind of defense secretary he hopes to be. >> i saw consequences, and suffering and horror of war. i did question a surge -- is this going to be worth the sacrifice? we lost almost 1,200 dead americans during that surge. now was it required? was it necessary? >> reporter: hagel the first defense secretary who saw combat as an enlisted soldier. as a poor kid from nebraska he and his brother tom volunteered to serve in vietnam and served in the same unit in 1968. both getting wounded. each crediting the other for saving their lives. >> i don't see the lens of every world event, whether we should use american power through the lens of vietnam. but it is part of me. >> reporter: hagel's service was praised. >> i admire your
. number one challenge to the united states from a foreign policy statement and the national security standpoint and chuck hagel simply off the page on this that was the primary reason i could not support him, whether it is republican or democrat, that took that position. >> let's go back are to where we began. saying it won't keep him from becoming the next man to lead the pentagon. by some counts it looks like he has 5 6 votes. enough to pass, maybe not enough to stave off a filibuster. where does this go? >> i think it's too early to tell based on the performance yesterday, i think new questions will arise. if democrats want to aabsolute the preside -- salute the president and turn their head the other way, i suppose he could be nominated. but i think democrats and republicans have real questions about whether this is the right person for this critical position. >> you think the 56 votes aren't really 56 votes after yesterday. >> i would want to go back and recount those after yesterday if i were senator hagel. >> thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> obviously we'll continue
at the national committee on american foreign policy and editor of the bimonthly journal "american foreign-policy interests." he was also on the senior advisory group of the u.s. africa command, since its creation. and was vice president for the position of the study of the middle east and africa. let's hear more from the commander of u.s. africa command at howard university last week. [video clip] >> our mission is to protect america and american interests from threats that may emerge from the continent of africa. we see this manifest itself in somalia with al-shabab. in the maghreb in the sahara, as putting out now in mali with al qaeda in the lands of the islamic maghreb. ansar al din as well. in nigeria, the existence of boko haram. these organizations all focused on undermining the governments of those countries and establishing their own regime of control outside of legitimate government control. i am very concerned about each of those individual entities such as al-shabab and the others, it is increasingly the coordination, the synchronization of efforts of those different organizations th
to the senate, i have been fortunate to be invited to his home for lengthy but fascinating foreign policy discussions with snoot colleagues on -- with senate colleagues and foreign policy experts. he was instrumental in securing passage of the new start treaty with russia. he served as an unofficial envoy to president obama to pakistan and some countries that probably none of us know where he went. there are many times he's come to me and said, i've got to go, and he tells me where he's going, thouing in the newspapers about -- nothing in the newspapers about where he'd gone. but he is a great evaluator of people, and because of that, the president trusts him and has sent him on all these missions. now he will do that as secretary of state. he's authored numerous pieces of legislation to prevent the global spread of h.i.v. aids. he also played a central role in crafting our policy in iraq and afghanistan in the war on traimpleterror. i can remember one time where he spent days and days with president karzai working 0en a difficult issue following the elections that they had there. he'he's
. and our foreign policy often makes no sense at all. and so i think we do need to reassess. we made this deal with mubarak. we didn't make this deal with morrissey. currently egypt is unraveling. i think it's a terrible mistake to send these weapons to egypt, and i hope my colleagues will consider that. thank you, madam president. i yield back high time and -- i yield back my time and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: a senator: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. under the previous order, there will be two minutes of debate equally divided prior to a vote in relation to amendment number 6 offered by the senator from ohio, mr. portman. the senator from ohio. mr. portman: thank you, madam president. we had a good debate earlier on this. this is the dollar-for-dollar deficit-reduction act. it makes all the sense in the world. we have a $16 trillion national debt now exceeding $130,000 per household in america. we're told by
on israel yesterday. it is a huge foreign-policy issue for the. they happen to be in the middle of an environment that is unsettled and without clear paths forward. it is a core interest of the united states. again, it is a scenario where politicians feel strongly and american voters feel extremely strongly. there were some differences of opinion but got explored yesterday. again, that is part of the point of the hearing process -- of a confirmation progress -- process, getting into areas where people have concerns. host: one of the exchanges about israel, democrat from rhode island. >> interviews and speeches, i have always said i am a supporter of israel. in some cases, i have said a -- i am a strong supporter. i think it is in my book that we have a special relationship with israel. we always have. so i have never voted against israel ever in the 12 years i was in the senate. additional supplemental appropriations, the record is very clear. i might add, as long as we're on the subject, -- senator mel -- nelson may have a clear view of this, there have been a couple of recent
what they think about it and all the power vacuums created by our foreign policy lately are not clearly prepared to keep the peace when we get involved in the arab spring. my point to mr. nixon this isn't the nobel gee we think you are pretty swell award it should go to the christian and muslim leaders in nigeria who are working to bridge the police there. political dissidents in cuba and russia. people doing real on-the-groundwork. so lazy to give it to hillary clinton. just lazy. >> garland, what do you think. >> if the republicans had v. spent one/1,000th of the energy benghazi thinkingalling l figuring out whether there was weapons of mass destruction in iraq as opposed to four in benghazi. >> i do want to bring in, i threw this out in the twitter world in the facebook world and we got a huge response. people very opinionated about whether or not this should happen. one of those responses, mike, sanveri if alfred nobel knew how politicized his peace prize had become he would be rolling in his grave the entire panel has become a farce. s is it too politicized, mike? >> it's almost as
and then we talk about our wonderful foreign policy. >> gretchen: she did talk about the fact that she did believe that the world was a more dangerous place now than ever before. but that was in the second part of the interview. the first part of the interview before the commercial break was talking about the relationship between president obama and mrs. clinton. i want now listen to this and then get your reaction. >> i just want to have a chance of to publicly say thank you 'cause i think hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we have. >> after i ended my campaign, i immediately did everything i could to help the president get elected because despite our hard fought primary, we had such agreement on what needed to be done for our country. >> it made for tough debates. >> it did. >> we could never figure out what we differed on. >> yeah. we worked at that pretty hard. >> i consider hillary a strong friend. >> very warm, close. i think there is a sense of understanding that sometimes doesn't even take words because we have similar views. we have similar experiences t
of the topics include foreign policy, and control, and women's abortion rights. it begins at noon eastern with cdc's "meet the press." at 1:00 p.m., but the ranking member of the foreign relations committees, senator john mccain, of addendas -- bob menendez. at two o'clock p.m. it is "fox news sunday." and assistant majority leader -- the state of the union follows at 3:00 p.m.. also a retired general and former cia director. administered by dianne feinstein and gov. bob macdonald of virginia and gov. scott walker of wisconsin. at 4:00, bob schieffer talks with senator dianne feinstein. the sending network talk shows this afternoon on c-span radio are brought to you by a public service by the network and c- span. the re-air begins -- you can listen to them all on c- span radio. nationwide on at some satellite radio channel 119. you can listen to on your smart phone or go online to c- spanradio.org >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> the best training -- you learn how to develop sources, you learn how the use intelligence information, you learn how to leverage relationships. t
is jessica zuckerman, research associate in our center for foreign policy studies. she studies researches and writes on border security, counterterrorism, immigration reform, democratic institutions, and the rule of law. prior to joining us in 2009 she was assistant to heritage is visiting fellow matt mayer and helped him research for his book, homeland security and federalism, protecting america from outside the beltway. she received her masters of public administration with an emphasis in federal policy from george washington university. she holds a bachelor of arts degree in spanish and international relations from ohio state university. please join me in welcoming my college, jessica zuckerman. jessica. [applause] >> and two, john. and thank you all for joining us today. the real id program sprang from the recommendation of the national commission on terrorist attacks upon the united states, better known as the 9/11 commission. the commission found that 18 of the 9/11 hijackers had 30 ids between them, including six that were used on the morning of the attack. the commission called on
be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous -- >> senator hagel, the question is, were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like answer whether you're right or wrong and then you're free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer. >> well let the record show you refused to answer that question. martha: that was uncomfortable. joined by missouri republican senator roy blunt who was in that hearing yesterday. senator, good morning. welcome, good to have you here today. we were arch watching this on television. what was it like in the room? >> well, my guess is in the room it was, it was a little less tense maybe than it appeared on television but certainly as these hearings go it was a pretty intense hearing. i didn't serve with senator hagel in the senate. he left the senate long before i got here. i served with him when he was in the house and i was in the senate. i like him. i admire his service in vietnam. hi
of the hard issues, those really traditional foreign policy international policy issues. some critics would say she didn't accomplish much of anything and she leaves john kerry a pretty fragile world. other people would say, no, she actually injected into the conversation, changed the conversation about international policy. what she talked about and what she followed through on were the issues of women's development, economic development, children, family and increasing the conversation as she would put it with people around the world, not just talking to governments, but beginning this two-way conversation with people all over the world. so that debate is going to go on for a long time. >> we're watching secretary of state hillary clinton say farewell to some of the 69,000 state department employees. john king and gloria borger are here in the studio with me. she has now a record high in the washington post/abc news poll. a 67% favorability rating and from december, democrats, 65% of democrates say they're likely to support hillary clinton if she seeks the democratic nomination for presid
or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no. >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous -- >> senator hagel, the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like the answer whether you are right or wrong and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. >> so it feels like the senator is still fighting the iraq war there. who do you think, alice, looks worse in the exchange between the two men? >> well, clearly hagel. he couldn't put up a good defense for his position in that particular area. this is one area where he just clearly didn't understand what his record was. he first was for the iraq war and then he was opposed to the iraq surge, saying it was a terrible blunder on the part of the u.s. when in fact it worked. he also had trouble answering questions about where he stands with israel. he has failed repeatedly in the past senator to show solidarity with our greatest friend and a
assistance from foreign countries to finance our government's reckless fiscal policies." he goes on to say -- "over the past five years, our federal debt has increased by $3.5 trillion to $8.6 trillion. that is trillion with a t. that is money that we have borrowed from the social security trust fund, borrowed from china and japan, borrowed from the american taxpayers. with over -- and over the next five years between now and 2011, the president's budget will increase the debt by almost $3.5 trillion." continuing to quote from senator obama in 2006, "numbers that large are sometimes hard to understand. some people may wonder why they matter. here is why. this year, the federal government will spend $220 billion on interest. that is more money to pay interest on our national debt than we'll spend on medicaid and the state children's health insurance program. that is more money than we pay interest on our debt this year than we will spend on education, homeland security, transportation and veterans' benefits combined. it's more in one year than we're likely to spend to rebuild the devastat
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)